Yat's Big Trip travel blog

Starting a little stroll around Sucre, the capital of Bolivia...

...with many white colonial churches...

...and white colonial buildings in general...

...the Cathedral at the Plaza de Armas...

...street musicians for the International Cultural Festival...

...and dancers, encouraging participation of the audience

Sucre, also known as the chocolate capital of Bolivia

And walking back into London...:p

Dancers at the end of waltzing around in the parade

These school kids have a little bit more until the end...

Girl on the right, with a different kind of whistle in her...

Accompanying musicians following at the back

Swinging energetic Andean dancers...

...and their more traditionally dressed musicians

Other Andean community performing their stuff

...

...and some little ones!!

...getting slightly bigger now...

...this one blows seriously on his pipe, with the grown up band....

Almost aerial view of Sucre from the hill...

...for a wonderful play of colours at sunset!


Due to some fruitless research the day before, my second day in Sucre didn't look very promising. Decided to take the "Dino Truck" to Cal Orcko, just outside the city, where there are tracks of prehistoric dinosaurs who roamed the land we now call Bolivia. The Dutchies had also highly recommended it to me.

Just shortly before noon, arrived at the Plaza, and walked around it a couple times and couldn't find the brightly painted truck as advertised on leaflets. A simple enquiry made to a lady manning an information booth found that it probably wasn't leaving for tours that day, due to the festival in town. And since Saturday was the main day of the festival, it's even more unlikely it would run then. I could postpone the trip, but I didn't want to go there enough to wait until Monday.

However managed to spend a surprisingly good day hanging around street corners, and the side of the Plaza. As is typical of festivals in South America, there were lots of parades. Have arrived in good time for a religious festival of Sucre's patron saint, which has been going on for the past four hundred years!! Throughout the day, there were many SureƱos (people of Sucre) dressed in colourful clothings (sometimes in luminous colours - very unnatural colours in the traditional Andean costumes!), of various ages, dancing down the streets. It brought back fond memories of when I had first got to Cusco, in the midst of the Festival of Cusco.

I loved watching the typical folk dancing - the men prancing about energetically, and the girls more graceful and timid. When they all danced in sync, it was especially beautiful. And broad smiles all around, when toddlers and little children danced - oh, they were all so cute!! In their little little costumes, and wearing a serious and determined expression that they would dance well! There were also some Spanish dancing, where the girls were flamboyantly whipping their dresses around them in dangerously little high heels, whilst their male partners demonstrated some impressingly fancy tapping footwork.

Was also recommended a little hike up to "Cafe Mirador", which was part of the "Museum of the Children of Tanga-Tanga" - with hands on activities for children to learn more about the geography of Bolivia and renewable energy. The view of the city of Sucre lying below was lovely, and saw one of the best sunsets so far. The sun setted majestically behind some mountains, and created some fantastic looking clouds.

You will see what I mean, when I finally get the photos off my camera and uploaded onto the website!!

As part of the "International Festival of Culture", thought should try to be more culturally enlightened by going to the movies for a viewing of "Di buen dia a Papa". Had no idea what it was about, except that it was probably religious, as there was a sad picture of the dying Christ on the poster. Turned out to be about the residents of Valle Grande in Bolivia, and how they perceived the death of Che Guevara, as the decades passed. It was interesting to see a movie made in Bolivia, but the plot was missing something to captivate the audience (well, me anyway). Though I thought I could understand most of what the Latinos say now, most of the dialogue went over my head... Oh dear, maybe I should go back to Spanish school!! :P



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