BareboatSailing-TheExumas travel blog

The 38-foot Alexian was registered in Vancouver, B.C.., Canada (First Mate's photo)

Footing was tricky in rough seas when winching the main sail up/down...

The second small Jib was more of a nuisance than an asset....

The helm had all the instruments needed for daytime sailing

The aft auxiliary solar panel kept the refrigerator powered for the whole...

The primary anchor was operated with a motorized windlass.

When mooring balls were available we used the "Bahamian mooring" technique -...

Roasting a meal of veggies and meat required creative space usage in...

By choreographing our food preparation tasks the 3 women managed to produce...

We mostly used the salon for its under-seat and shelf storage.

The electrical panel (right wall) and Navigation table below and behind the...

The head in one pod had a removable shower head on the...

With no holding tank we tried as much as possible to only...

We spent most of our time in the shade of the bimini...

The kayaks were lifted aboard each night but we left the dinghy...

Lifting the motor before hoisting the dinghy to its hangers was too...

Transfering the dinghy motor to its stand on the stern deck was...

After removing the motor the dinghy had to be hooked on and...

Using the dinghy ladder the First Mate improvised a back rest for...

Movie Clips - Playback Requirements - Problems?

(MP4 - 5.21 MB)

Two identical cabins in this pod shared one head. The Captain's cabin...


The Alexian


Because of the shallowness of the ocean waters and the numerous coral heads in the area we had chosen for this year's trip, the Captain suggested we charter a catamaran. The Alexian best met our capacity and price requirements.

She was registered in Vancouver, B.C., Canada

Type of boat: Catamaran

Builder: Leopard 38

Length: 38'0"

Year: 2000

Draft: 4'0"

Beam: 21'0"

Engine: Yanmar 2 x 39hp (3JH5E) -- one in each hull

Passagers maximum: 6

Cabins: 3

Heads: 2 + 1 separate shower compartment

The helm was equipped with many modern instruments, including a compass, a GPS system and a depth finder.

The main anchor was managed using a remotely controlled windlass motor. There was a secondary anchor but the conditions were not rough enough to require its use on this trip.

There were two Genoa Jib sails as well as a fully-battened Main sail. We didn't use the smaller Jib sail and found it to be more of a nuisance than an asset. All winches were manual -- yes, we had to winch the sails using good ol' muscle power. To raise/lower the Main sail the First Mate and Hubby had to balance on the deck at the foot of the mast and crank a winch while being sure the clutches under the boom didn't stick -- not an easy task when the boat was rocking.

The dinghy could be raised into position above the aft dive platform using one of the manual winches, but only after removing the heavy outboard motor and securing it to its position at an aft guard rail post.

The auxiliary solar panel, something we did not have on previous charters, did a good job of keeping the refrigerator powered.

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